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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Louisiana's Moon Shot

 

Louisiana is disappearing faster than any land in the world. Sea level rise and coastal erosion threaten some of the nation’s crucial oil, gas and fishing industries. But Louisiana has a “Moon shot” plan to save it. ProPublica reporter Bob Marshall tells us about the state’s ambitious, first-of-its-kind plan to preserve the region, and the cost if they fail.

 

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Meltdown in Tibet

 

The glaciers of Tibetan plateau feed into rivers that provide water to the much of the Asian continent. But now China has begun damming some of those rivers to generate power for its massive population. It’s also exploiting Tibet’s mineral and wildlife resources, forcing the displacement of Tibet’s nomads.

 

Read More »

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Harvesting "Himalayan Viagra"

 

A Tibetan fungus is being sold on the Chinese medicine market as an immune booster and aphrodisiac, bringing lots of income to rural villages on the Tibetan plateau. High demand threatens to deplete the resource, but now one small village in Nepal is harvesting the fungus sustainably.

 

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Purple Martins: Extroverts of the Air

 

East of the Mississippi, purple martins gather. Writer Mark Seth Lender watches a handful of purple martins as they catch insects, squabble, and converse, and ponders what they could be chattering on about.

 

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The Quest for the ‘Asian Unicorn’

 

Deep in the forests of Southeast Asia lives a creature that, in profile, looks like a unicorn, but it’s almost as rare as that mythic beast. The saola is related to wild cattle, but little is known about it, except that it and its habitat are disappearing. An expedition into the jungles of Laos to study the saola reveals the beauty of the region and the obstacles researchers face to saving the saola before it’s gone forever.

 

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New Music Brings John Muir's Story to Life

 

John Muir is considered one of the fathers of the conservation movement in the United States. The Western landscape reflects his environmental legacy with places like the John Muir Trail, Muir Glacier, and Muir Woods, but now an urban chamber music group called Chance has set out to celebrate Muir's life in song. They created a “narrative concert” that incorporates vocals, string instruments, and readings from Muir’s own written work.

 

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Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

 

New research finds that every 1 degree Celsius of temperature rise eventually equates to 2.3 meters of sea level rise. Anders Levermann tells host Steve Curwood about the expectations for sea level rise over the next 2,000 years.

 

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White House Confronts Climate Deniers

 

Some skeptical pundits have used the recent deep cold snap to suggest that climate change isn’t real. White House Science Advisor John Holdren says not so fast.

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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Newly Discovered Algae Helps Corals In Warming Oceans

Coral reefs are a delicate ecosystem. Their health largely relies on the symbiotic relationship between algae and corals, which typically breaks down in warmer water. But a newly discovered species of algae is allowing corals in the Persian Gulf to withstand rising ocean temperatures.

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Pond Scum May Be Associated With ALS and Alzheimer's

Blue-green algae are actually a type of bacteria that proliferates due to excess nutrients in streams and lakes. It can be toxic to humans and animals, and as the world warms, these poisonous bacteria are blooming more frequently in waters around the globe, and may be associated with liver disease and neurological disorders.

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Louisiana's Moon Shot

Louisiana is disappearing faster than any land in the world. Sea level rise and coastal erosion threaten some of the nation’s crucial oil, gas and fishing industries. But Louisiana has a “Moon shot” plan to save it. ProPublica reporter Bob Marshall tells us about the state’s ambitious, first-of-its-kind plan to preserve the region, and the cost if they fail.

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This Week’s Show
July 3, 2015
listen / download


Newly Discovered Algae Helps Corals In Warming Oceans

listen / download
Coral reefs are a delicate ecosystem. Their health largely relies on the symbiotic relationship between algae and corals, which typically breaks down in warmer water. But a newly discovered species of algae is allowing corals in the Persian Gulf to withstand rising ocean temperatures.

Pond Scum May Be Associated With ALS and Alzheimer's

listen / download
Blue-green algae are actually a type of bacteria that proliferates due to excess nutrients in streams and lakes. It can be toxic to humans and animals, and as the world warms, these poisonous bacteria are blooming more frequently in waters around the globe, and may be associated with liver disease and neurological disorders.

Louisiana's Moon Shot

listen / download
Louisiana is disappearing faster than any land in the world. Sea level rise and coastal erosion threaten some of the nation’s crucial oil, gas and fishing industries. But Louisiana has a “Moon shot” plan to save it. ProPublica reporter Bob Marshall tells us about the state’s ambitious, first-of-its-kind plan to preserve the region, and the cost if they fail.

Climate Change & Pacific Northwest Glaciers

listen / download
Glaciers set the Pacific Northwest apart and are essential for the region’s drinking water, hydropower and salmon survival. But as EarthFix’s Ashley Ahearn reports, disappearing glaciers make the region uniquely vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

Meltdown in Tibet

listen / download
The glaciers of Tibetan plateau feed into rivers that provide water to the much of the Asian continent. But now China has begun damming some of those rivers to generate power for its massive population. It’s also exploiting Tibet’s mineral and wildlife resources, forcing the displacement of Tibet’s nomads.

Harvesting "Himalayan Viagra"

listen / download
A Tibetan fungus is being sold on the Chinese medicine market as an immune booster and aphrodisiac, bringing lots of income to rural villages on the Tibetan plateau. High demand threatens to deplete the resource, but now one small village in Nepal is harvesting the fungus sustainably.


Special Features

East Claridon, Ohio

listen / download
In this week’s trip to the place where you live, Anne Kelsey takes us to East Claridon, Ohio, where her family has owned land for 100 years and the morning quiet on the pond is sacred.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live

A River Town in Transition

listen / download
Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches


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You know, Alaska is the jewel of the world when it comes to fisheries management. This state is second to none, and that's because you don't see dams on our rivers. You don't see a lot of development that will have a negative impact.

-- Mike Erikson, CEO of Alaska Glacier Seafoods

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