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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Hubbard Brook: An 8,000-acre Test Tube

 

In the 1950s, the U.S. Forest Service set aside a swath of the White Mountains for forest science research. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest has proven invaluable as the site of long-term and groundbreaking studies. Scientists Gene Likens and Dick Holmes helped begin the project and have been involved in research there for decades, leading to discoveries of acid rain and the consequences of clear-cutting.

 

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In the 1950s, the U.S. Forest Service set aside a swath of the White Mountains for forest science research. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest has proven invaluable as the site of long-term and groundbreaking studies. Scientists Gene Likens and Dick Holmes helped begin the project and have been involved in research there for decades, leading to discoveries of acid rain and the consequences of clear-cutting.

Saving East Coast Sea Life

 

President Obama has designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

 

Read More »

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'Fish Guy' Aims To Scan All The Fishes

 

University of Washington biology professor Adam Summers has a deep ambition: to make CT scans of every species of fish in the world, and he is well on his way. Researchers anywhere have free access to this growing database of digitized images.

 

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War Veterans Farm For Health

 

Veterans must often wait months for health appointments at VA facilities. So a combat vet in Georgia founded a farm designed to immerse returning soldiers in the restorative rigors of working the land, a special boost for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Reporter Sean Powers has the story.

 

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Standing Rock And The Feds

 

After a judge denied a halt to construction of the section of the Dakota Access pipeline that borders the Standing Rock Sioux Nation reservation, three federal agencies issued a joint hold on the portion in dispute. We turned to Vermont Law School Professor Pat Parenteau to explain the legal basis of this action and what it implies for Native American rights in future.

 

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Dakota Pipeline Fight

 

For weeks, Native Americans have been protesting a planned oil pipeline slated to cross the Missouri River in North Dakota. The Standing Rock Sioux Nation says the construction threatens their drinking water and infringes on their historic lands, but petroleum officials say the project is a safe way to transport a valuable American asset and would bring jobs. Jaime Kaiser reports.

 

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Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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Romance and Spring Harvest At Paradise Lot

 

For most gardeners, springtime means a few seedlings on a window sill. But for perennial gardeners spring is a time of harvest. The new book, Paradise Lot, is a personal and heartwarming account of finding romance and growing a permaculture food forest on a degraded backyard plot in a gritty neighborhood of Holyoke, MA.

 

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Saving East Coast Sea Life

President Obama has designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

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Wine, Water and Natural Gas

Fracking has been banned in New York since 2015. But as the Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports, a proposal to store natural gas in underground salt caverns in the state's scenic Finger Lakes region has touched off concern over the safety of a local water source.

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Hubbard Brook: An 8,000-acre Test Tube

In the 1950s, the U.S. Forest Service set aside a swath of the White Mountains for forest science research. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest has proven invaluable as the site of long-term and groundbreaking studies. Scientists Gene Likens and Dick Holmes helped begin the project and have been involved in research there for decades, leading to discoveries of acid rain and the consequences of clear-cutting.

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This Week’s Show
September 23, 2016
listen / download


Saving East Coast Sea Life

listen / download
President Obama has designated nearly 5000 square miles of canyons and deep ravines in the seas off Massachusetts, the first marine national monument in the Atlantic. This maritime treasure’s extraordinarily rich biological diversity ranges from massive corals to single-celled organisms the size of softballs.

EPA Sued Over Ocean Acidification

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The Center for Biological Diversity has filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency that accuses the EPA of failing to set appropriate standards to protect coastal waters from acidification.

One Smart Slime-Emerging Science Note

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A goopy single-celled organism may seem like an unlikely choice for research on cognition. But the yellow slime mold has a lot to teach us about how creatures make decisions when they apparently don’t have brains.

Wine, Water and Natural Gas

listen / download
Fracking has been banned in New York since 2015. But as the Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports, a proposal to store natural gas in underground salt caverns in the state's scenic Finger Lakes region has touched off concern over the safety of a local water source.

Beyond The Headlines

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In this week’s trip Beyond the Headlines, we go back to the music of the 1970s to invoke long-standing and maybe prescient thoughts on the California drought. And new studies reveal how nutrient pollution in the ocean is helping disrupt the vital soundscape marine life needs. Also in environmental history, some fish and other wildlife that became potent symbols in U.S. politics.

Hubbard Brook: An 8,000-acre Test Tube

listen / download
In the 1950s, the U.S. Forest Service set aside a swath of the White Mountains for forest science research. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest has proven invaluable as the site of long-term and groundbreaking studies. Scientists Gene Likens and Dick Holmes helped begin the project and have been involved in research there for decades, leading to discoveries of acid rain and the consequences of clear-cutting.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

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Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Cowee, North Carolina

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion magazine’s longtime feature in which people write about the place they call home. In this week’s edition, songwriter Angela-Faye Martin uses her words and music to picture her North Carolina valley on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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