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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

The 2016 Goldman Environmental Prizes-Part II

 

We continue our coverage of this year’s Goldman Environmental Prize winners with Edward Loure, who secured communal land-rights for Tanzanian herders; Zuzana Caputova, who shut down a poisonous waste dump in Slovakia; and Leng Ouch, who exposed and stopped illegal logging operations in Cambodia.

 

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Puerto Rican Scientist Saves Leatherback Turtles and More from Hotel Development

 

In the late 1990s Puerto Rican developers proposed building two mega-resorts in a rich ecological zone called the Northeast Ecological Corridor. Luis Jorge Rivera Herrera, an environmental scientist on the island, called attention to the risks the development posed to nesting sites for endangered leatherback turtles, and the other plants and animals in this biodiversity hot spot. His activism stopped the resorts from being built, and earned him a Goldman Environmental Prize.

 

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UN Climate Chief Calls for Urgent Action

 

Earth Day 2016 brought a significant milestone for the Paris Agreement, as some 175 nations signed on at the UN in New York. Yet the ambitious goals of this climate agreement are not guaranteed without aggressive moves to curb carbon pollution. UN climate chief Christiana Figueres discusses what’s required to give civilization a fighting chance.

 

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The 2016 North American Goldman Prize Winner, a Student from Baltimore

 

Destiny Watford was still a high school student when she discovered that a massive trash incinerator planned for her hometown would likely be a source of choking pollution. Here’s her story of how she galvanized her fellow students and citizens to oppose this threat to her community’s health.

 

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Youth Win Right to Sue Feds Over Climate Change

 

A federal judge in Oregon has found that 21 young people have the right to sue the federal government for failing to properly protect future generations from the dangers of climate change. If the case makes it to trial, it could become the science trial of the century.

 

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Great Green Wonder of the World

 

Africa’s Great Green Wall is making slow progress, and helping provide employment to keep young people on the land. We take a closer look at the hopes for the project to help local economies and the environment.

 

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Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

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Bayou Community Struggles with Sinkhole

 

A huge sinkhole in the tiny swamp community of Bayou Corne is giving residents unique and unpleasant challenges. It is now approximately 20 acres in size.

 

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Migrations Off Schedule

 

The monarch butterflies are late, the wildebeest have turned around, and the North Atlantic right whales are missing. What’s going on with the world’s great animal migrations?

 

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Baby Powder User Awarded Cancer Damages

Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay $72 million in damages to the family of a woman who used baby powder genitally most of her life and died from ovarian cancer last year. We discuss what’s known about the possible link between talc and this rare but deadly cancer, and what convinced a jury to find Johnson & Johnson at fault.

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Chernobyl Wildlife Thrive 30 Years Later

Biologist Jim Smith offers his perspective on the health of insects and mammals living inside the Chernobyl exclusion zone. With radiation levels that vary from place to place, and the essential abandonment of the area by humans, the animals are faring surprisingly well.

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The 2016 Goldman Environmental Prizes-Part II

We continue our coverage of this year’s Goldman Environmental Prize winners with Edward Loure, who secured communal land-rights for Tanzanian herders; Zuzana Caputova, who shut down a poisonous waste dump in Slovakia; and Leng Ouch, who exposed and stopped illegal logging operations in Cambodia.

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This Week’s Show
April 29, 2016
listen / download


Baby Powder User Awarded Cancer Damages

listen / download
Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay $72 million in damages to the family of a woman who used baby powder genitally most of her life and died from ovarian cancer last year. We discuss what’s known about the possible link between talc and this rare but deadly cancer, and what convinced a jury to find Johnson & Johnson at fault.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
This week we discuss planned floating nuclear reactors in the South China Sea and risks from fungicide-dusted Bordeaux wine grapes, and then remember a pivotal event in the Love Canal toxic waste disaster.


Remembering Chernobyl

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Three decades after the world’s worst nuclear power plant disaster, radiation levels in the town of Pripyat near Chernobyl have decreased some. But when Living on Earth’s Bruce Gellerman went to Chernobyl ten years after the disaster, it was a different story. We revisit his report.

Chernobyl Wildlife Thrive 30 Years Later

listen / download
Biologist Jim Smith offers his perspective on the health of insects and mammals living inside the Chernobyl exclusion zone. With radiation levels that vary from place to place, and the essential abandonment of the area by humans, the animals are faring surprisingly well.

The 2016 Goldman Environmental Prizes-Part II

listen / download
We continue our coverage of this year’s Goldman Environmental Prize winners with Edward Loure, who secured communal land-rights for Tanzanian herders; Zuzana Caputova, who shut down a poisonous waste dump in Slovakia; and Leng Ouch, who exposed and stopped illegal logging operations in Cambodia.

Puerto Rican Scientist Saves Leatherback Turtles and More from Hotel Development

listen / download
In the late 1990s Puerto Rican developers proposed building two mega-resorts in a rich ecological zone called the Northeast Ecological Corridor. Luis Jorge Rivera Herrera, an environmental scientist on the island, called attention to the risks the development posed to nesting sites for endangered leatherback turtles, and the other plants and animals in this biodiversity hot spot. His activism stopped the resorts from being built, and earned him a Goldman Environmental Prize.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

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Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Cowee, North Carolina

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion magazine’s longtime feature in which people write about the place they call home. In this week’s edition, songwriter Angela-Faye Martin uses her words and music to picture her North Carolina valley on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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