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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

The Place Where You Live: Omaha, Nebraska

 

In his essay for Orion Magazine, Patrick Mainelli, a writer and community college professor in Nebraska, describes his morning commute through the wilds of urban Omaha.

 

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How Beavers Help Save Water

 

In the drought-ridden West, some people are partnering with beavers to restore watersheds, where, before trappers arrived, the large rodents once numbered in the millions. Film-maker Sarah Koenigsberg captures various efforts to reintroduce beavers to their former habitat in her documentary The Beaver Believers and illustrates why beavers are essential for a healthy ecosystem.

 

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Insuring Wildlife and the Lives of Endangered Rhinos

 

South African game reserves are eager to earn tourist dollars with elephants, giraffes and rhinos. But to protect the rhinos and their prized horns from poaching, reserve owners are insuring their animals and also poisoning the horns. Living on Earth’s Bobby Bascomb reports.

 

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Stewardship Saturdays in Boston Harbor

 

Boston’s Harbor Islands offer a scenic retreat from the bustle of the city, but they’re very vulnerable to inundation by invasive plant species. Living on Earth’s Olivia Powers visited Grape Island on a “Stewardship Saturday” to watch young conservationists pull buckthorn.

 

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Ancient Wheat and the Rise of Agriculture

 

The discovery of 8,000 year-old wheat DNA off the coast of England 2000 years before people began farming there has archaeologists rethinking their theories about the rise of agriculture.

 

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FBI Questions Keystone XL Activists

 

In October 2014, the FBI began contacting at least a dozen people who had been involved in protests against fracking and tar sands oil development, including the Keystone XL pipeline. We speak with reporter Becky Kramer and attorney Larry Hildes about the FBI’s investigation and the history of surveillance against political activists.

 

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Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

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Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Prairie Rattlesnake

 

A few months ago writer Mark Seth Lender met his first Prairie Rattlesnake up close and personal, and found the snake fascinating, and though venomous, not a threat.

 

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Oil Train Safety Off Track

In the past five weeks, there have been 5 oil train derailments resulting in large fireballs, and more oil was spilled in 2014 than in the last 38 years combined. While everyone agrees that the trains need to stay on the tracks, industry, railroad officials and oil experts offer different solutions to this multifaceted problem.

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Conservationists Help Workers Strike for Refinery Safety

This week the United Steelworkers Union, representing oil refinery workers, reached an agreement with Shell Oil, ending a strike primarily about workplace safety. The strike was one of the largest in the industry's history, and some environmental organizations joined the picket line in solidarity.

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How Beavers Help Save Water

In the drought-ridden West, some people are partnering with beavers to restore watersheds, where, before trappers arrived, the large rodents once numbered in the millions. Film-maker Sarah Koenigsberg captures various efforts to reintroduce beavers to their former habitat in her documentary The Beaver Believers and illustrates why beavers are essential for a healthy ecosystem.

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This Week’s Show
March 20, 2015
listen / download


Oil Train Safety Off Track

listen / download
In the past five weeks, there have been 5 oil train derailments resulting in large fireballs, and more oil was spilled in 2014 than in the last 38 years combined. While everyone agrees that the trains need to stay on the tracks, industry, railroad officials and oil experts offer different solutions to this multifaceted problem.

Conservationists Help Workers Strike for Refinery Safety

listen / download
This week the United Steelworkers Union, representing oil refinery workers, reached an agreement with Shell Oil, ending a strike primarily about workplace safety. The strike was one of the largest in the industry's history, and some environmental organizations joined the picket line in solidarity.

One Woman Fought Shell Oil To Save Her Town

listen / download
Norco, Louisiana is named after the New Orleans Refinery Company, which built a highly polluting refinery there in the early 20th century. The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier tells the story of Norco resident, Margie Richard, who went all the way to the UN to fight for her town’s public health.

The Place Where You Live: Omaha, Nebraska

listen / download
In his essay for Orion Magazine, Patrick Mainelli, a writer and community college professor in Nebraska, describes his morning commute through the wilds of urban Omaha.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra discusses a global flatline in carbon emissions for 2014, increases in climate coverage by the media, and how beavers have flourished since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone.

How Beavers Help Save Water

listen / download
In the drought-ridden West, some people are partnering with beavers to restore watersheds, where, before trappers arrived, the large rodents once numbered in the millions. Film-maker Sarah Koenigsberg captures various efforts to reintroduce beavers to their former habitat in her documentary The Beaver Believers and illustrates why beavers are essential for a healthy ecosystem.


Special Features

New Orleans, Louisiana

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion Magazine’s long-time feature, The Place Where You Live, where essayists write about the place they call home. This week, we travel to New Orleans, Louisiana, where ecology student Erik Iverson describes the beauty of his state’s fragmented deltas, and how this threatened land unites a people.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live

Mémé’s Meat Pie
Maine singer/songwriter Denny Breau shares his Mémé’s Meat Pie recipe, a holiday season tradition.
Blog Series: Cooking on Earth


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You know, Alaska is the jewel of the world when it comes to fisheries management. This state is second to none, and that's because you don't see dams on our rivers. You don't see a lot of development that will have a negative impact.

-- Mike Erikson, CEO of Alaska Glacier Seafoods

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