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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Great Bear Rainforest Protected From Massive Logging

 

Logging is now banned in 85% of the vibrant Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia, the result of decades of negotiations involving a diverse group of stakeholders, including the timber industry, environmental activists, First Nations, and the BC government. Temperate rainforests are one of the most rare ecosystems on Earth.

 

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A Vision to End the Hassle of Urban Parking

 

Looking for parking in a city is frustrating for the driver and bad for the climate as circling cars emit unnecessary carbon dioxide, but self-diving cars could soon bring an end to congested urban parking as we know it—making cities more climate friendly, transportation cheaper and more efficient, and freeing up acres of valuable urban space.

 

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Flint and Environmental Racism

 

The case of Flint, Michigan’s lead poisoning and water crisis is a blatant example in a long history of environmental injustice in the United States, and as Prof. Robert Bullard, the “father of environmental justice” says, racism and classism often contribute to incidents like these and slow governmental responses.

 

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The End of Night

 

Humans have always had a primal fear of the dark, but the advent of electric light in the late 19th century brought the developed world control over the night. But with an explosion of light pollution blocking out the natural night sky in much of the world, and writer Paul Bogard says we may have gone too far.

 

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Conserving the Dark

 

In a world flooded with artificial night, a clear view of the night sky has become increasingly rare, but a National Park Service team is working to reduce light pollution in and around parks to make sure that people can always find a place to see the stars. Emmett Fitzgerald joins one of the rangers for a night walk through Utah’s Arches National Park.

 

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Polar Bear Summits Talus Mound

 

Up in the arctic north of Canada’s Akpatok Island, a large, male polar bear climbs crags in search of murre fledglings, but instead finds a plane full of sightseers rounding the bluff, surprising each other.

 

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Prairie Rattlesnake

 

A few months ago writer Mark Seth Lender met his first Prairie Rattlesnake up close and personal, and found the snake fascinating, and though venomous, not a threat.

 

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Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Great Bear Rainforest Protected From Massive Logging

Logging is now banned in 85% of the vibrant Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia, the result of decades of negotiations involving a diverse group of stakeholders, including the timber industry, environmental activists, First Nations, and the BC government. Temperate rainforests are one of the most rare ecosystems on Earth.

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A Novel Way to Capture and Release the Warmth of the Sun

Storing solar energy is an enduring challenge for scientists, but now a team of MIT researchers has developed a new material that could trap it and release it as heat on demand to do such things as defrost windshields and warm our clothes.

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A Vision to End the Hassle of Urban Parking

Looking for parking in a city is frustrating for the driver and bad for the climate as circling cars emit unnecessary carbon dioxide, but self-diving cars could soon bring an end to congested urban parking as we know it—making cities more climate friendly, transportation cheaper and more efficient, and freeing up acres of valuable urban space.

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This Week’s Show
February 5, 2016
listen / download


Great Bear Rainforest Protected From Massive Logging

listen / download
Logging is now banned in 85% of the vibrant Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia, the result of decades of negotiations involving a diverse group of stakeholders, including the timber industry, environmental activists, First Nations, and the BC government. Temperate rainforests are one of the most rare ecosystems on Earth.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
We hear about some good news this week, including reductions in air pollution costs and less toxins in fish. Then, we look back at Donald Trump’s battle against Scottish wind power.

A Novel Way to Capture and Release the Warmth of the Sun

listen / download
Storing solar energy is an enduring challenge for scientists, but now a team of MIT researchers has developed a new material that could trap it and release it as heat on demand to do such things as defrost windshields and warm our clothes.

What's New for Electric Cars

listen / download
Gasoline prices are low right now, yet some manufacturers are close to launching affordable electric cars with a 200-mile range. How battery systems like Tesla’s Powerwall and electric car offerings—combined with home solar electricity—could help stabilize the grid, and add flexibility to our greener energy future.

A Vision to End the Hassle of Urban Parking

listen / download
Looking for parking in a city is frustrating for the driver and bad for the climate as circling cars emit unnecessary carbon dioxide, but self-diving cars could soon bring an end to congested urban parking as we know it—making cities more climate friendly, transportation cheaper and more efficient, and freeing up acres of valuable urban space.


Special Features

A River Town in Transition

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Wrangell, Alaska is a small, isolated town at the mouth of the mighty Stikine River and a former a timber capital. But since the saw mills shut down in the ‘90s, the small town has reinvented itself as a tourist destination and a commercial fishing hub. Since both of these industries are dependent on the Stikine, some locals worry that a mining development upriver could put the whole town’s livelihood at risk.
Blog Series: Alaskan River Riches

Cowee, North Carolina

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion magazine’s longtime feature in which people write about the place they call home. In this week’s edition, songwriter Angela-Faye Martin uses her words and music to picture her North Carolina valley on the edge of the Great Smoky Mountains.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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