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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Stewardship Saturdays in Boston Harbor

 

Boston’s Harbor Islands offer a scenic retreat from the bustle of the city, but they’re very vulnerable to inundation by invasive plant species. Living on Earth’s Olivia Powers visited Grape Island on a “Stewardship Saturday” to watch young conservationists pull buckthorn.

 

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Ancient Wheat and the Rise of Agriculture

 

The discovery of 8,000 year-old wheat DNA off the coast of England 2000 years before people began farming there has archaeologists rethinking their theories about the rise of agriculture.

 

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FBI Questions Keystone XL Activists

 

In October 2014, the FBI began contacting at least a dozen people who had been involved in protests against fracking and tar sands oil development, including the Keystone XL pipeline. We speak with reporter Becky Kramer and attorney Larry Hildes about the FBI’s investigation and the history of surveillance against political activists.

 

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Learning to Climb

 

By late summer, the lambs of Rocky Mountain Bighorn sheep have grown, equipped with feet that can grip on sheer cliff faces, but as writer Mark Seth Lender observed in Alberta’s Jasper National Park, this may not be enough--a ewe can lead her lambs to the edge, but it is they who have to negotiate the way down, alone.

 

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Tribal Nations Against Keystone Pipeline

 

Legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline is now on the President’s desk, but the project has faced stiff opposition for years. The pipeline will affect many people along its route, and despite direct impact from the pipeline’s route though US tribal nations’ lands, the US government has failed to adequately consult them and negotiate the matter, leaving tribal nations united in frustration and concern for the future.

 

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Gus Speth Calls for a "New" Environmentalism

 

NRDC co-founder Gus Speth reflects on the environmental movement both as a previous ‘insider’ and now as a reformer. In his new memoir “Angels by the River” Gus Speth calls for deeper challenges to the economic status quo, and explores his life and career at the nexus of race, environment and politics.

 

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Russia Nixes Antarctic Marine Reserve

 

Negotiators from 25 countries met in Germany recently in a bid to create a massive marine reserve in the seas around Antarctica. But at the last minute, Russia backed out of the deal.

 

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White House Confronts Climate Deniers

 

Some skeptical pundits have used the recent deep cold snap to suggest that climate change isn’t real. White House Science Advisor John Holdren says not so fast.

 

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Trout Are Speaking

 

Commentator Mark Seth Lender contemplates the rainbow trout.

 

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Presidential Hopefuls and Climate Change

As the planet heats up, so does the race for the 2016 presidential election. The National Journal’s energy reporter Clare Foran talks with us about the views of leading contenders on climate change and how that could impact their viability as candidates.

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Harvard Divestment Case In Court

On February 20th, 2015, Harvard students who are suing the University in a bid to force it to divest its endowment from fossil fuel investments got a chance to tell a judge why their case should proceed, and not be dismissed before any trial on the merits, as Harvard has requested.

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Ancient Wheat and the Rise of Agriculture

The discovery of 8,000 year-old wheat DNA off the coast of England 2000 years before people began farming there has archaeologists rethinking their theories about the rise of agriculture.

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This Week’s Show
February 27, 2015
listen / download


Presidential Hopefuls and Climate Change

listen / download
As the planet heats up, so does the race for the 2016 presidential election. The National Journal’s energy reporter Clare Foran talks with us about the views of leading contenders on climate change and how that could impact their viability as candidates.

Harvard Divestment Case In Court

listen / download
On February 20th, 2015, Harvard students who are suing the University in a bid to force it to divest its endowment from fossil fuel investments got a chance to tell a judge why their case should proceed, and not be dismissed before any trial on the merits, as Harvard has requested.

Stewardship Saturdays in Boston Harbor

listen / download
Boston’s Harbor Islands offer a scenic retreat from the bustle of the city, but they’re very vulnerable to inundation by invasive plant species. Living on Earth’s Olivia Powers visited Grape Island on a “Stewardship Saturday” to watch young conservationists pull buckthorn.

The Federal Animal Killing Program

listen / download
For more than a century, a US federal program called Wildlife Services has been killing millions of animals—some allegedly inhumanely and unwarranted—funded by private interests and taxpayer money. But critics say the program, which is administered by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Division of the US Department of Agriculture (APHIS), is too often not in service of the animals or ecosystem, and with little regulation, transparency and accountability, it will continue to violate environmental laws and profit from animal deaths.

Ancient Wheat and the Rise of Agriculture

listen / download
The discovery of 8,000 year-old wheat DNA off the coast of England 2000 years before people began farming there has archaeologists rethinking their theories about the rise of agriculture.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra tells us about a climate denial funding scandal and the 104th anniversary of the Weeks Act, which established federal forest protections.


Special Features

New Orleans, Louisiana

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Living on Earth is giving a voice to Orion Magazine’s long-time feature, The Place Where You Live, where essayists write about the place they call home. This week, we travel to New Orleans, Louisiana, where ecology student Erik Iverson describes the beauty of his state’s fragmented deltas, and how this threatened land unites a people.
Blog Series: The Place Where You Live

Mémé’s Meat Pie
Maine singer/songwriter Denny Breau shares his Mémé’s Meat Pie recipe, a holiday season tradition.
Blog Series: Cooking on Earth


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You know, Alaska is the jewel of the world when it comes to fisheries management. This state is second to none, and that's because you don't see dams on our rivers. You don't see a lot of development that will have a negative impact.

-- Mike Erikson, CEO of Alaska Glacier Seafoods

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