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Public Radio's Environmental News Magazine (follow us on Google News)

Low Ambition Climate Summit

 

The annual meeting of the UN Climate treaty parties in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt known as COP27 went two days into overtime as negotiators worked late into the night hammering out a consensus. While the sleep-deprived delegates did produce an unprecedented agreement for rich nations to pay for loss and damage from climate disasters in poor countries, COP27 added no new brakes to keep the Earth from hurtling past the 1.5 degrees Celsius warming target of the Paris Agreement.

 

Read More »

The annual meeting of the UN Climate treaty parties in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt known as COP27 went two days into overtime as negotiators worked late into the night hammering out a consensus. While the sleep-deprived delegates did produce an unprecedented agreement for rich nations to pay for loss and damage from climate disasters in poor countries, COP27 added no new brakes to keep the Earth from hurtling past the 1.5 degrees Celsius warming target of the Paris Agreement.

Breakthrough for Loss and Damage

 

One bright star from the recent UN climate treaty talks in Egypt (COP27) is the agreement for wealthy nations to create a fund to pay for “loss and damage” from impacts of the climate disruption to lower income countries. But no money has been provided yet to stricken nations and there are still plenty of details to be worked out.

 

Read More »

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The Reign of Wolf 21

 

Wolf expert Rick McIntyre’s 2020 book "The Reign of Wolf 21" is the true love story of an alpha pair who lead their Yellowstone pack with grace, courage, and an unbreakable bond. We share the story of these remarkable wolves’ lives and what they can teach us about love, loyalty, and leadership.

 

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Climate at the Ballot Box

 

Steve Curwood and Environmental Health News’ Weekend Editor Peter Dykstra take a look at the 2022 midterms to analyze incoming Governors, outgoing Senators, and the only two ballot initiatives on climate.

 

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Climate Action Winner in the Golden State

 

California Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom handily won re-election and now has 4 more years to work towards his goal of achieving carbon neutrality in the state by 2045. Lauren Sanchez, Senior Climate Advisor to Governor Newsom, takes a look at California’s top climate priorities and how the Golden State intends to lead on climate amid an uncertain national political landscape.

 

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New President to Protect Amazon

 

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, known as Lula, is headed back to another term in the Brazilian Presidency. In sharp contrast to defeated incumbent Jair Bolsonaro, Lula has pledged to protect the Brazilian Amazon and indigenous communities from illegal mining, agriculture and land grabbing, explains Karla Mendes, contributing editor to Mongabay.

 

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The Ancient Call of the Sandhill Crane

 

Each fall, sandhill cranes return to winter refuges in the southern U.S. and Mexico. Writer Jennifer Junghans reflects on what their ancient calls evoke in her when they return to her city of Sacramento, California each year.

 

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Join the Living on Earth Book Club on October 13th!

 

Bestselling science journalist Ed Yong joins us to talk about his new book. Click here to learn more and register!

 

Read More »

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Celebrating 30 years of Living on Earth!

 

Host Steve Curwood in the Living on Earth studio

 

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Low Ambition Climate Summit


The annual meeting of the UN Climate treaty parties in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt known as COP27 went two days into overtime as negotiators worked late into the night hammering out a consensus. While the sleep-deprived delegates did produce an unprecedented agreement for rich nations to pay for loss and damage from climate disasters in poor countries, COP27 added no new brakes to keep the Earth from hurtling past the 1.5 degrees Celsius warming target of the Paris Agreement.

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Breakthrough for Loss and Damage


One bright star from the recent UN climate treaty talks in Egypt (COP27) is the agreement for wealthy nations to create a fund to pay for “loss and damage” from impacts of the climate disruption to lower income countries. But no money has been provided yet to stricken nations and there are still plenty of details to be worked out.

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Cleaning Up Crypto


Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin can take a huge toll on electricity rates and the climate. That’s because “mining” cryptocurrencies typically involves massive amounts of computation, which takes lots of energy that’s mostly sourced from burning fossil fuels. But now there’s a far more efficient way to earn new coins if cryptocurrency managers decide to adopt it.

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This Week’s Show
November 25, 2022
listen / download



Low Ambition Climate Summit

listen / download
The annual meeting of the UN Climate treaty parties in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt known as COP27 went two days into overtime as negotiators worked late into the night hammering out a consensus. While the sleep-deprived delegates did produce an unprecedented agreement for rich nations to pay for loss and damage from climate disasters in poor countries, COP27 added no new brakes to keep the Earth from hurtling past the 1.5 degrees Celsius warming target of the Paris Agreement.

Breakthrough for Loss and Damage

listen / download
One bright star from the recent UN climate treaty talks in Egypt (COP27) is the agreement for wealthy nations to create a fund to pay for “loss and damage” from impacts of the climate disruption to lower income countries. But no money has been provided yet to stricken nations and there are still plenty of details to be worked out.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
Good news for salmon on the Klamath River, where four major dams are slated to soon come down. Also, a survey finds that climate activists who threw soup on a Vincent Van Gogh painting may not have helped the cause of climate action. And in the history calendar, 11 years ago attorneys for Tokyo Electric Power tried to argue that the radiation released by its Fukushima plant was no longer the company’s problem – because it was owned by the people it fell on.

Living on Earth Gives Thanks

listen / download
To celebrate Thanksgiving, the cast and crew of Living on Earth shares the things we’re grateful for this year.

Note on Emerging Science: Eel-icit Affairs

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European eels journey three to six thousand miles from the rivers of Europe to the Atlantic Ocean, and now thanks to satellite trackers, researchers have the first direct evidence that the Sargasso Sea is where they mate. And that knowledge can help protect these critically endangered animals.

Cleaning Up Crypto

listen / download
Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin can take a huge toll on electricity rates and the climate. That’s because “mining” cryptocurrencies typically involves massive amounts of computation, which takes lots of energy that’s mostly sourced from burning fossil fuels. But now there’s a far more efficient way to earn new coins if cryptocurrency managers decide to adopt it.

“The Nutmeg’s Curse”: Join the next LOE Book Club!

listen / download
Join the Living on Earth Book Club on November 28th at 4 p.m. Eastern on Zoom for an interview with award-winning author Amitav Ghosh. His book ‘The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis’ uses the haunting history of how nutmeg became a staple of the spice rack to reveal how colonialism and the commodification of the Earth’s resources has led us to the climatic tipping points and global crises we face today.


Special Features

Field Note: Wishful Thinking - Leopards of the Olare Oruk River
Young leopards have a lot to learn. In the Maasai Mara, on the banks of the Olare Oruk River, Explorer in Residence Mark Seth Lender followed one such Young leopard progress along the learning curve.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Captive Audience
Cooperative hunting among birds is rare but Explorer in Residence Mark Seth Lender shares an unexpected instance among yellow-billed storks in Kenya.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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