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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

FDA Scientist Finds Weed Killer on Many Foods

 

The common herbicide glyphosate is considered to be a probable carcinogen by a World Health Organization agency. New e-mails uncovered through a FOIA request reveal that an FDA scientist found glyphosate residue on nearly every food item tested, including cereals, crackers, and honey, but the FDA hasn’t made the key results public.

 

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The common herbicide glyphosate is considered to be a probable carcinogen by a World Health Organization agency. New e-mails uncovered through a FOIA request reveal that an FDA scientist found glyphosate residue on nearly every food item tested, including cereals, crackers, and honey, but the FDA hasn’t made the key results public.

UN Climate Talks Gear Up for December

 

The 190 or so nations in the Paris Climate Agreement will come together in December at a summit in Poland aimed at agreeing on rules to implement the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015. Negotiators recently met in Bonn to try to iron out any disagreements in advance of the high-level session.

 

Read More »

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Nepal’s Threatened Wetlands

 

The lofty Himalayas give rise to an intricate system of rivers and lakes that make Nepal rich in wetlands. These are critical habitats for migrating birds and rare species like the Bengal tiger and one-horned rhino, but the wetlands are not well protected and face numerous threats from development to climate change.

 

Read More »

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Saving Kerala's Fresh Water

 

Like much of South Asia, the Indian state of Kerala depends on the prolific monsoon rains for water to drink and grow food. But weak monsoons and recent droughts make water conservation and management vital, so farmers and householders are rediscovering old methods that are yielding new water security.

 

Read More »

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The Koch Brothers & Trump

 

As close ties between fossil fuel billionaires Charles and David Koch and the Trump Administration come more to light, a group of Democratic Senators led by Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) is demanding answers about how much influence the Koch brothers have had in shaping key federal policies.

 

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Alaska Youth Sue to Fight Climate Change

 

16 young people are suing their home state of Alaska for failing to protect their constitutional right to a healthy environment. They argue the state must reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but most of Alaska’s earnings depend on oil production.

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

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Turkish Development Threatens Marine Life

 

Recent protests in Turkey were sparked by the government's plans to pave over a public park. Journalist Sulmaan Khan joins host Steve Curwood to explain how rapid development in Turkey is causing a host of environmental problems. (photo: bigstockphoto.com)

 

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FDA Scientist Finds Weed Killer on Many Foods

The common herbicide glyphosate is considered to be a probable carcinogen by a World Health Organization agency. New e-mails uncovered through a FOIA request reveal that an FDA scientist found glyphosate residue on nearly every food item tested, including cereals, crackers, and honey, but the FDA hasn’t made the key results public.

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UN Climate Talks Gear Up for December

The 190 or so nations in the Paris Climate Agreement will come together in December at a summit in Poland aimed at agreeing on rules to implement the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015. Negotiators recently met in Bonn to try to iron out any disagreements in advance of the high-level session.

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Saving Kerala's Fresh Water

Like much of South Asia, the Indian state of Kerala depends on the prolific monsoon rains for water to drink and grow food. But weak monsoons and recent droughts make water conservation and management vital, so farmers and householders are rediscovering old methods that are yielding new water security.

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This Week’s Show
May 18, 2018
listen / download


FDA Scientist Finds Weed Killer on Many Foods

listen / download
The common herbicide glyphosate is considered to be a probable carcinogen by a World Health Organization agency. New e-mails uncovered through a FOIA request reveal that an FDA scientist found glyphosate residue on nearly every food item tested, including cereals, crackers, and honey, but the FDA hasn’t made the key results public.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
This week we cover China’s high-rise hog farms and the salt water intrusion threatening one of California’s most agriculturally productive lands, and we remember a distinguished 19th-century scientist who was an early observer of global warming and the heat island effect of cities.

Cool Fix for a Hot Planet: Storing CO2 in Rocks

listen / download
Scientists are studying how rocks might capture and store a greenhouse gas to help cool the planet. Solidified lava and magma could perhaps safely store carbon dioxide, through a chemical reaction that forms a stable solid carbonate from the climate-warming gas and the rock.

UN Climate Talks Gear Up for December

listen / download
The 190 or so nations in the Paris Climate Agreement will come together in December at a summit in Poland aimed at agreeing on rules to implement the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015. Negotiators recently met in Bonn to try to iron out any disagreements in advance of the high-level session.

BirdNote®: Dippers on the Elwha

listen / download
Many species in the Pacific Northwest benefitted from the removal of Elwha River dams, among them American Dippers, as Mary McCann explains in today’s BirdNote®.

Nepal’s Threatened Wetlands

listen / download
The lofty Himalayas give rise to an intricate system of rivers and lakes that make Nepal rich in wetlands. These are critical habitats for migrating birds and rare species like the Bengal tiger and one-horned rhino, but the wetlands are not well protected and face numerous threats from development to climate change.

Saving Kerala's Fresh Water

listen / download
Like much of South Asia, the Indian state of Kerala depends on the prolific monsoon rains for water to drink and grow food. But weak monsoons and recent droughts make water conservation and management vital, so farmers and householders are rediscovering old methods that are yielding new water security.


Special Features

Lawmakers Call for Pruitt to Resign

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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is under heavy fire for alleged legal and ethical violations, and a record number of lawmakers say "enough is enough." Some 140 House members and 39 senators, all caucusing with Democrats, have signed on to a non-binding resolution introduced by Representative Kathy Castor of Florida and Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico calling for Mr. Pruitt’s resignation. Senator Tom Udall discusses with host Steve Curwood Pruitt's ethical red flags that have recently come to light, and the EPA rollbacks the Senator says are harmful to human health.
Blog Series: LOE Updates

Field Note: Eagles At Play
In this field note, Living on Earth’s Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender remarks on the powerful hold the American Bald Eagle has on our collective awe, and on how severely we have decimated their numbers in the centuries since Europeans landed on North America’s shores.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Sexual Misconduct in the U.S. Forest Service: Michaela Myers' Story

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Michaela Myers finished college in 2017 and landed what she thought was a dream job: working with the US Forest Service fighting wildfires in Oregon. But a pattern of sexual harassment and hazing by her boss and colleagues turned that dream into a nightmare. She tells her story to Living on Earth host Steve Curwood.
Blog Series: LOE Updates


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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