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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Youth Strike for Climate

 

On March 15 an estimated million school children around the world went on strike for the climate, inspired by Greta Thunberg, who began striking outside the Swedish parliament during school hours in August of 2018, when she was just fifteen years old. Anna Grace Hottinger, who helped organize the school strikes in the US, discusses the movement.

 

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On March 15 an estimated million school children around the world went on strike for the climate, inspired by Greta Thunberg, who began striking outside the Swedish parliament during school hours in August of 2018, when she was just fifteen years old. Anna Grace Hottinger, who helped organize the school strikes in the US, discusses the movement.

Carbon Pricing and the Green New Deal

 

The Green New Deal resolution recently introduced to Congress by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) calls for the U.S. to quickly decarbonize its economy, but does not mention of carbon pricing, despite much interest from economists. Stephen Stromberg, an editorial writer for the Washington Post, explains why the Post urges that any Green New Deal should put a high price on carbon rather than impose government mandates to encourage decarbonization.

 

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“Hockey Stick” Climatologist Wins Tyler Prize

 

Climatologist Michael Mann shared the 2019 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, which is nicknamed “the Nobel Prize for the environment”. Professor Mann recounts his research that led to the famous “hockey stick” graph, which shows rapid global temperature rise. He also talks about the ensuing attacks on his scientific research and reputation by climate deniers, his latest research, and the promising new generation of science communicators.

 

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Tornado Clusters and Climate Disruption

 

Outbreaks of tornado clusters are being stoked by climate change, research shows. Florida State University Professor James Elsner explains how tornadoes are clustering in our warming world.

 

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Oceans Losing Oxygen

 

Warmer water naturally holds less oxygen than cool water, and pollutants like nitrogen and phosphorus only add to deoxygenated zones that can be harmful to some creatures. Denise Breitburg, senior scientist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center explains the dangers of deoxygenation for sea creatures, and what needs to be done to address the crisis.

 

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Cloning Giant Sequoias

 

The 3000 year-old Giant Sequoias and Coast Redwood trees of the Pacific Northwest are some of the biggest and oldest individual living things on our planet. Sadly, all but a few have been cut down for lumber. Led by Co-Founder David Milarch, the non-profit Archangel Ancient Tree Archive is helping to restore these majestic, carbon-sequestering trees by cloning their DNA.

 

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Hummingbirds in the Canyon

 

Watching hummingbirds in Arizona's Madera Canyon gave Mark Seth Lender an up close view of their interactions, and a chance to take spectacular photos.

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Youth Strike for Climate

On March 15 an estimated million school children around the world went on strike for the climate, inspired by Greta Thunberg, who began striking outside the Swedish parliament during school hours in August of 2018, when she was just fifteen years old. Anna Grace Hottinger, who helped organize the school strikes in the US, discusses the movement.

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Carbon Pricing and the Green New Deal

The Green New Deal resolution recently introduced to Congress by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) calls for the U.S. to quickly decarbonize its economy, but does not mention of carbon pricing, despite much interest from economists. Stephen Stromberg, an editorial writer for the Washington Post, explains why the Post urges that any Green New Deal should put a high price on carbon rather than impose government mandates to encourage decarbonization.

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“Hockey Stick” Climatologist Wins Tyler Prize

Climatologist Michael Mann shared the 2019 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, which is nicknamed “the Nobel Prize for the environment”. Professor Mann recounts his research that led to the famous “hockey stick” graph, which shows rapid global temperature rise. He also talks about the ensuing attacks on his scientific research and reputation by climate deniers, his latest research, and the promising new generation of science communicators.

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This Week’s Show
March 15, 2019
listen / download


Youth Strike for Climate

listen / download
On March 15 an estimated million school children around the world went on strike for the climate, inspired by Greta Thunberg, who began striking outside the Swedish parliament during school hours in August of 2018, when she was just fifteen years old. Anna Grace Hottinger, who helped organize the school strikes in the US, discusses the movement.

Carbon Pricing and the Green New Deal

listen / download
The Green New Deal resolution recently introduced to Congress by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) calls for the U.S. to quickly decarbonize its economy, but does not mention of carbon pricing, despite much interest from economists. Stephen Stromberg, an editorial writer for the Washington Post, explains why the Post urges that any Green New Deal should put a high price on carbon rather than impose government mandates to encourage decarbonization.

Beyond The Headlines

listen / download
For this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra dishes out the disappointing truth about air purifying houseplants. Then, he dives into the impact that illegal gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon has on deforestation. From the history vault, in 2009, President Obama signed the Omnibus Public Land Management Act.

BirdNote®: How a Bird Came to Look Like a Caterpillar

listen / download
The Amazon is home to many visually interesting species – including a bird whose chick looks like a caterpillar! BirdNote’s Michael Stein explains the phenomenon of Batesian mimicry, where certain species try to trick their would-be predators into thinking they’d make for a dangerous meal.

“Hockey Stick” Climatologist Wins Tyler Prize

listen / download
Climatologist Michael Mann shared the 2019 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, which is nicknamed “the Nobel Prize for the environment”. Professor Mann recounts his research that led to the famous “hockey stick” graph, which shows rapid global temperature rise. He also talks about the ensuing attacks on his scientific research and reputation by climate deniers, his latest research, and the promising new generation of science communicators.


Special Features

Field Note: A Great Egret's Mating Dance
Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence Mark Seth Lender remarks on the scene that inspired his essay about a Great Egret's mating dance.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Climate and the Majestic Gyrfalcon
"In the Arctic, there is no such thing as bad luck when it comes to good stories," writes Living on Earth's Explorer In Residence, Mark Seth Lender. In this Field Note he explains why a series of unfortunate events on a recent trip turned out to be a blessing that brought a rare gyrfalcon sighting, the inspiration for an essay.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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