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Public Radio's Environmental News Magazine (follow us on Google News)

Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve

 

In the remote wilderness of the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve stands as one of the least-traveled U.S. National Parks. Officially proclaimed a national monument and preserve in 1978, Aniakchak is always open to visitors, with no amenities, no cell service, and no park rangers -- hence its slogan, “No lines, no waiting!” Chris Solomon, who wrote about Aniakchak for Outside magazine, describes his experience there among the grizzly bears and volcanism.

 

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In the remote wilderness of the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve stands as one of the least-traveled U.S. National Parks. Officially proclaimed a national monument and preserve in 1978, Aniakchak is always open to visitors, with no amenities, no cell service, and no park rangers -- hence its slogan, “No lines, no waiting!” Chris Solomon, who wrote about Aniakchak for Outside magazine, describes his experience there among the grizzly bears and volcanism.

A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration

 

Every spring and fall, a journey of thousands of miles begins, as migrating birds find their way between breeding and overwintering grounds. It’s an incredible phenomenon that naturalist Kenn Kaufman brings to life in his book, A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration. Kaufman is the author of the Kaufman Field Guide series and is also a contributing field editor with the Audubon Society. He joined Host Steve Curwood to talk about his latest book and what our species can do to avoid harming birds on their remarkable journeys.

 

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Prehistoric Magnetic Flip Shook Up Life on Earth

 

Earth’s magnetic poles wander around and flip every now and then, and now scientists have evidence for how these flips impact life on Earth. Carolyn Gramling wrote about the research for Science News and joins Host Bobby Bascomb to talk about how a magnetic pole reversal about 41,000 years ago is linked to megafauna extinctions, climatic changes, and even a rise in ancient cave art.

 

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Horse of a Different Color

 

Living on Earth's Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender shares his appraisal of an artistic herd of zebras in Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya.

 

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One in Five Deaths from Fossil Fuels

 

Ultrafine particulate matter emitted from fossil fuel combustion is known to cause numerous health issues, and a recent study finds that this pollution is responsible for one in five early deaths worldwide, including more than 300,000 deaths a year in the United States. Pediatrician Aaron Bernstein, who is the interim director of the Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment at Harvard, joins Host Steve Curwood to discuss the implications of the research.

 

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Families Sickened by Fracking

 

The fracking boom transformed large swaths of rural America, turning towns from idyllic to industrial, and threatening the physical and mental health of many inhabitants. In a four-part series for Environmental Health News, Kristina Marusic tested five different families for 40 different chemicals associated with fracking and found that every person studied was carrying a massive chemical body burden. She joins Host Bobby Bascomb to talk about the families whose lives have been upended by their local fracking operations. 

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Tibetan Monks Saving Snow Leopards

 

Snow Leopards are among the most endangered of the world’s big cats, but now Tibetan monks are giving the leopard hope. (Camera trap photo of a snow leopard on the Tibetan plateau (photo: Panthera))

 

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Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve

In the remote wilderness of the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve stands as one of the least-traveled U.S. National Parks. Officially proclaimed a national monument and preserve in 1978, Aniakchak is always open to visitors, with no amenities, no cell service, and no park rangers -- hence its slogan, “No lines, no waiting!” Chris Solomon, who wrote about Aniakchak for Outside magazine, describes his experience there among the grizzly bears and volcanism.

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Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors

Some stereotypes in the US among people of European descent about who can be “outdoorsy” can leave people of color out, so environmental educator CJ Goulding actively and creatively works to encourage young people of color to feel that they belong in the outdoors, too. CJ Goulding speaks with Host Steve Curwood about how his Air Jordan “Bred” 11 sneakers help him link young people of color to the great outdoors.

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Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands

Coronado National Forest, north of Tucson, Arizona is home to plenty of heat and cacti, of course – but also many species ordinarily found far north of the desert Southwest. With a local biologist as her guide, Bobby Bascomb reports on the remarkably diverse biomes of Arizona’s Sky Islands.

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This Week’s Show
April 9, 2021
listen / download


Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve

listen / download
In the remote wilderness of the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve stands as one of the least-traveled U.S. National Parks. Officially proclaimed a national monument and preserve in 1978, Aniakchak is always open to visitors, with no amenities, no cell service, and no park rangers -- hence its slogan, “No lines, no waiting!” Chris Solomon, who wrote about Aniakchak for Outside magazine, describes his experience there among the grizzly bears and volcanism.

Why I Wear Jordans in the Great Outdoors

listen / download
Some stereotypes in the US among people of European descent about who can be “outdoorsy” can leave people of color out, so environmental educator CJ Goulding actively and creatively works to encourage young people of color to feel that they belong in the outdoors, too. CJ Goulding speaks with Host Steve Curwood about how his Air Jordan “Bred” 11 sneakers help him link young people of color to the great outdoors.

Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands

listen / download
Coronado National Forest, north of Tucson, Arizona is home to plenty of heat and cacti, of course – but also many species ordinarily found far north of the desert Southwest. With a local biologist as her guide, Bobby Bascomb reports on the remarkably diverse biomes of Arizona’s Sky Islands.

Spring Awakening

listen / download
Montana-based writer Rick Bass shares the stories of playful grizzly bears coming out of hibernation as winter melts away into spring.

A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration

listen / download
Every spring and fall, a journey of thousands of miles begins, as migrating birds find their way between breeding and overwintering grounds. It’s an incredible phenomenon that naturalist Kenn Kaufman brings to life in his book, A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration. Kaufman is the author of the Kaufman Field Guide series and is also a contributing field editor with the Audubon Society. He joined Host Steve Curwood to talk about his latest book and what our species can do to avoid harming birds on their remarkable journeys.


Special Features

Field Note: Horse of a Different Color
Why do zebra and wildebeest often herd together in a "Razzle-Dazzle" of stripes? Living on Earth's Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender ponders and shares his insights.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Bottlenose Whales in the Arctic
Living on Earth's Explorer-in Residence Mark Seth Lender ponders the big questions that might be shared by species beyond our own.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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