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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads

 

A recent study has revealed phthalates and volatile organic compounds in brands of single-use diapers and sanitary pads. Exposure to these toxic chemicals can lead to a variety of health complications, including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Jodi Flaws, a co-author on the paper, joins Bobby Bascomb to talk about these toxicants and how they impact health.

 

Read More »

A recent study has revealed phthalates and volatile organic compounds in brands of single-use diapers and sanitary pads. Exposure to these toxic chemicals can lead to a variety of health complications, including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Jodi Flaws, a co-author on the paper, joins Bobby Bascomb to talk about these toxicants and how they impact health.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ Frogs’ First Steamy Date

 

Sehuencas water frogs have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and until recently, the last remaining survivor was believed to be “Romeo”, who had been on his own for ten years and had long since stopped calling for a mate. In December of 2018, scientists discovered five other Sehuencas water frogs, including a female of breeding age, who has aptly been named “Juliet”. Sofia Barrón Lavayen, the manager of captive breeding at the K’ayra Center at the Museum of Natural History in Cochabamba, Bolivia, talks about these not-so-star-crossed lovers.

 

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Exploring The Parks: North Cascades National Park

 

North Cascades National Park, just a three-hour drive from Seattle, is at the heart of one of Washington State’s most expansive and exquisite wild ecosystems. Despite having more glaciers than Glacier National Park, North Cascades is one of the least visited parks in the United States.

 

Read More »

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Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land

 

Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York is dedicated to not only growing food, but also cultivating equity. Its ten black, brown and Jewish farmers aim to dismantle injustice within the food system. Farmer Leah Penniman discusses her journey as a woman of color reclaiming her space in the agricultural world.

 

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Climate Migrant Caravans

 

Near the end of 2018, several thousands of Central American migrants began journeys to the United States. Many of those people are fleeing a massive, five-year drought. John Sutter, a Senior Investigative Reporter for CNN joins us to investigate how climate change has impacted the migrant caravans.

 

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Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon

 

This installment in our occasional series on America’s public lands takes us to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the lower 48 states. Savannah Boiano of the Sequoia Parks Conservancy discusses the highlights of these jewels of the national parks system, including the giant sequoia trees, as well as hundreds of miles of hiking trails.

 

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Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

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Climate Departure Date

 

A group of scientists at the University of Hawaii have figured out a way to project when the climate at a given location will move outside the range of anything we’ve known in modern times. It’s sooner then you think.

 

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Prairie Rattlesnake

 

A few months ago writer Mark Seth Lender met his first Prairie Rattlesnake up close and personal, and found the snake fascinating, and though venomous, not a threat.

 

Read More »

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Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads

A recent study has revealed phthalates and volatile organic compounds in brands of single-use diapers and sanitary pads. Exposure to these toxic chemicals can lead to a variety of health complications, including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Jodi Flaws, a co-author on the paper, joins Bobby Bascomb to talk about these toxicants and how they impact health.

picture

‘Romeo and Juliet’ Frogs’ First Steamy Date

Sehuencas water frogs have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and until recently, the last remaining survivor was believed to be “Romeo”, who had been on his own for ten years and had long since stopped calling for a mate. In December of 2018, scientists discovered five other Sehuencas water frogs, including a female of breeding age, who has aptly been named “Juliet”. Sofia Barrón Lavayen, the manager of captive breeding at the K’ayra Center at the Museum of Natural History in Cochabamba, Bolivia, talks about these not-so-star-crossed lovers.

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Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land

Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York is dedicated to not only growing food, but also cultivating equity. Its ten black, brown and Jewish farmers aim to dismantle injustice within the food system. Farmer Leah Penniman discusses her journey as a woman of color reclaiming her space in the agricultural world.

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This Week’s Show
August 23, 2019
listen / download


Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads

listen / download
A recent study has revealed phthalates and volatile organic compounds in brands of single-use diapers and sanitary pads. Exposure to these toxic chemicals can lead to a variety of health complications, including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Jodi Flaws, a co-author on the paper, joins Bobby Bascomb to talk about these toxicants and how they impact health.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ Frogs’ First Steamy Date

listen / download
Sehuencas water frogs have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and until recently, the last remaining survivor was believed to be “Romeo”, who had been on his own for ten years and had long since stopped calling for a mate. In December of 2018, scientists discovered five other Sehuencas water frogs, including a female of breeding age, who has aptly been named “Juliet”. Sofia Barrón Lavayen, the manager of captive breeding at the K’ayra Center at the Museum of Natural History in Cochabamba, Bolivia, talks about these not-so-star-crossed lovers.

Exploring The Parks: North Cascades National Park

listen / download
North Cascades National Park, just a three-hour drive from Seattle, is at the heart of one of Washington State’s most expansive and exquisite wild ecosystems. Despite having more glaciers than Glacier National Park, North Cascades is one of the least visited parks in the United States.

Refugees Cultivate Healing Through Gardening

listen / download
The Neighbor’s Field is a community garden in rural Georgia which is designed to help refugees heal from the pain and trauma of war by planting a garden. Producer Sean Powers of Georgia Public Broadcasting and the Bitter Southerner podcast has the story.

Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land

listen / download
Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York is dedicated to not only growing food, but also cultivating equity. Its ten black, brown and Jewish farmers aim to dismantle injustice within the food system. Farmer Leah Penniman discusses her journey as a woman of color reclaiming her space in the agricultural world.


Special Features

Field Note: Monarch Migration
Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender muses on the multi-generational migrations of monarch butterflies and on their remarkable return after a hurricane.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Camels at the Henbury Craters
Living on Earth's Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender, comments on the relatively minimal habitat needed to support the dwindling populations of non-native dromedary camels now living in Australia.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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