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Public Radio's Environmental News Magazine (follow us on Google News)

Underwater Wild: My Octopus Teacher's Extraordinary World

 

Underwater explorer Craig Foster dives nearly every day in the near-shore waters of South Africa and it’s here that he befriended an octopus, a relationship captured in the documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” He’s coauthor of the 2021 book “Underwater Wild” and joined us for a memorable LOE Book Club event to talk about his encounters with cuttlefish, sharks, and Cape clawless otters, and the power of connecting with wild nature.

 

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Underwater explorer Craig Foster dives nearly every day in the near-shore waters of South Africa and it’s here that he befriended an octopus, a relationship captured in the documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” He’s coauthor of the 2021 book “Underwater Wild” and joined us for a memorable LOE Book Club event to talk about his encounters with cuttlefish, sharks, and Cape clawless otters, and the power of connecting with wild nature.

Migratory Monarch Butterflies Now Endangered

 

One of the world's most beloved insects, the migratory monarch butterfly, has been declared endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as upwards of 80% of migratory monarchs have died off in the past two decades. Tierra Curry, senior scientist with the Center for Biological Diversity, discusses what can be done to help save the iconic butterflies.

 

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The Health Toll of L.A.’s Oil Rigs

 

There are about 700 active oil and gas wells in the city of Los Angeles, mostly located in minority communities like the one where young activist Nalleli Cobo grew up, just 30 feet from a well. She and her neighbors have suffered for years from headaches, asthma, and cancer -- illnesses linked to the proximity of oil well sites. For her work fighting the oil companies operating those wells Nalleli was awarded the 2022 Goldman Environmental prize.

 

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A Leg Up for a Baby Giraffe

 

A baby giraffe at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park named Msituni was born with a disability that gave her trouble walking. So her veterinary team found a creative way to help her heal, explains Matt Kinney, senior veterinarian at the Safari Park.

 

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Spectacular Images From Deep Space

 

The James Webb Space Telescope is the most powerful observatory ever launched into space – and now, after six months of the mission, NASA has publicly released the telescope’s first full-color images and data. Stefanie Milam, the Deputy Project Scientist for Planetary Science at NASA, gives an update on the first images.

 

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Big Dog, Soft Mouth

 

An elephant seal could easily crush most any bird but our Explorer in Residence, Mark Seth Lender, watches as one instead gives repeated warnings to a nuisance petrel.

 

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Solar Powered Ship

 

The world’s largest solar powered boat made history by circumnavigating the globe. The ship is now busy in the Atlantic collecting data about the Gulf Stream.

 

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Turkish Development Threatens Marine Life

 

Recent protests in Turkey were sparked by the government's plans to pave over a public park. Journalist Sulmaan Khan joins host Steve Curwood to explain how rapid development in Turkey is causing a host of environmental problems. (photo: bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

 

New research finds that every 1 degree Celsius of temperature rise eventually equates to 2.3 meters of sea level rise. Anders Levermann tells host Steve Curwood about the expectations for sea level rise over the next 2,000 years.

 

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Plastics Linked to Rising Rates of Autism

The CDC reports that 1 in 44 children are currently identified with autism spectrum disorder and that number is growing yearly. In a commentary and study in the journal Pediatrics, scientists and clinicians urged that autism research should consider genetic interactions with synthetic compounds, including the hormone-disrupting class of chemicals called phthalates. Phthalates are common in plastics. Study coauthor Dr. Irva Hertz-Picciotto explains the interaction between chemicals, genes, folic acid, and autism.

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Bald Eagle in Central Park

Bald eagles were nearly driven to extinction in the 20th century but are now making a big comeback. These majestic creatures are becoming so common that people including Living on Earth's Sophia Pandelidis are spotting them in the most unexpected places, even the heart of Manhattan.

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Underwater Wild: My Octopus Teacher's Extraordinary World

Underwater explorer Craig Foster dives nearly every day in the near-shore waters of South Africa and it’s here that he befriended an octopus, a relationship captured in the documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” He’s coauthor of the 2021 book “Underwater Wild” and joined us for a memorable LOE Book Club event to talk about his encounters with cuttlefish, sharks, and Cape clawless otters, and the power of connecting with wild nature.

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This Week’s Show
August 5, 2022
listen / download


Plastics Linked to Rising Rates of Autism

listen / download
The CDC reports that 1 in 44 children are currently identified with autism spectrum disorder and that number is growing yearly. In a commentary and study in the journal Pediatrics, scientists and clinicians urged that autism research should consider genetic interactions with synthetic compounds, including the hormone-disrupting class of chemicals called phthalates. Phthalates are common in plastics. Study coauthor Dr. Irva Hertz-Picciotto explains the interaction between chemicals, genes, folic acid, and autism.

Note On Emerging Science: Polar Bears Use Tools to Hunt Walruses

listen / download
With large tusks and weighing over 2,000 pounds, walruses are a formidable foe for Arctic wildlife. But as Living on Earth’s Don Lyman reports, polar bears are utilizing tools such as ice blocks or large stones to hunt walruses as access to other food sources for the bears declines.

Bald Eagle in Central Park

listen / download
Bald eagles were nearly driven to extinction in the 20th century but are now making a big comeback. These majestic creatures are becoming so common that people including Living on Earth's Sophia Pandelidis are spotting them in the most unexpected places, even the heart of Manhattan.

Underwater Wild: My Octopus Teacher's Extraordinary World

listen / download
Underwater explorer Craig Foster dives nearly every day in the near-shore waters of South Africa and it’s here that he befriended an octopus, a relationship captured in the documentary “My Octopus Teacher.” He’s coauthor of the 2021 book “Underwater Wild” and joined us for a memorable LOE Book Club event to talk about his encounters with cuttlefish, sharks, and Cape clawless otters, and the power of connecting with wild nature.


Special Features

Field Note: Big Dog, Soft Mouth
Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender reflects on how our limited perspective influences our perception of nature.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Field Note: Gotta Getta Fish!
Living on Earth's Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender elaborates on the singular moment when a young osprey first leaves the nest.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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