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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Seas Rising Faster With Antarctic Melt

 

A new study in Nature finds Antarctica is now shedding more than 200 billion metric tons of ice every year, mostly from its western ice shelves. That’s three times the melt rate of just a decade ago, with major implications for sea level rise. Climate disruption is largely to blame.

 

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A new study in <i>Nature</i> finds Antarctica is now shedding more than 200 billion metric tons of ice every year, mostly from its western ice shelves. That’s three times the melt rate of just a decade ago, with major implications for sea level rise. Climate disruption is largely to blame.

Humpback Whales Rebound

 

Nineteenth century commercial whaling killed the vast majority of whales but some species are coming back – especially humpback whales. An abundance of krill from melting Antarctic ice has led to a thriving population of humpbacks – a conservation victory that also raises questions about how long the krill boom will last.

 

Read More »

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The Last Lobster

 

Maine lobstermen have hauled unprecedented catches and big profits in recent years as the lobsters have migrated up the east coast. But now, the booming industry is seeing some signs of a downturn as Writer Christopher White explains in his book, The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine’s Greatest Fishery.

 

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Tough Climate At The G7

 

Leaders from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States convened in Quebec, Canada for the G7 Summit with climate one of the items on the agenda. But President Trump left before the climate discussions began and the meeting ended in a conspicuous rift between the United States and its closest allies. Alden Meyer, the Director of Strategy and Policy at the Union of Concerned Scientists, explains how this could impact international climate policy going forward.

 

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Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America

 

The Americas have been home to humans for at least fifteen thousand years, and people appear to have left signs they were here far earlier, too. Some likely used boats to travel along the coast of what is now Russia and Alaska as well as perhaps trekking the Bering land bridge. In his book, Atlas of a Lost World: Travels in Ice Age America, author-adventurer Craig Childs follows in their footsteps, reflecting on how a changing climate likely forced these ancient peoples to adapt.

 

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Zero Carbon Nuclear Boost For New Jersey

 

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy recently signed into law subsidies for two aging nuclear power plants. Some say the deal helps New Jersey meet its climate protection goals, but others have criticized the measure, citing safety concerns and a preference for renewables.

 

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Nuclear Storage Crisis

 

The meltdown at Fukushima in Japan may be grabbing all the headlines, but with the Yucca Mountain project in perpetual limbo the United States has a nuclear storage problem on its hands as well.

 

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Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

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Solar Powered Ship

 

The world’s largest solar powered boat made history by circumnavigating the globe. The ship is now busy in the Atlantic collecting data about the Gulf Stream.

 

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Seas Rising Faster With Antarctic Melt

A new study in Nature finds Antarctica is now shedding more than 200 billion metric tons of ice every year, mostly from its western ice shelves. That’s three times the melt rate of just a decade ago, with major implications for sea level rise. Climate disruption is largely to blame.

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Humpback Whales Rebound

Nineteenth century commercial whaling killed the vast majority of whales but some species are coming back – especially humpback whales. An abundance of krill from melting Antarctic ice has led to a thriving population of humpbacks – a conservation victory that also raises questions about how long the krill boom will last.

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The Last Lobster

Maine lobstermen have hauled unprecedented catches and big profits in recent years as the lobsters have migrated up the east coast. But now, the booming industry is seeing some signs of a downturn as Writer Christopher White explains in his book, The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine’s Greatest Fishery.

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This Week’s Show
June 22, 2018
listen / download


Seas Rising Faster With Antarctic Melt

listen / download
A new study in Nature finds Antarctica is now shedding more than 200 billion metric tons of ice every year, mostly from its western ice shelves. That’s three times the melt rate of just a decade ago, with major implications for sea level rise. Climate disruption is largely to blame.

Boston’s Rising Tide

listen / download
Boston Harbor is subject to king tides as large as 12 feet and as sea level rises, storm surges combined with king tides put much of downtown Boston at risk of flooding.

Humpback Whales Rebound

listen / download
Nineteenth century commercial whaling killed the vast majority of whales but some species are coming back – especially humpback whales. An abundance of krill from melting Antarctic ice has led to a thriving population of humpbacks – a conservation victory that also raises questions about how long the krill boom will last.

Beyond The Headlines

listen / download
Peter Dykstra discusses the Chesapeake Bay’s improvement of ecosystem health and Costa Rica’s pledge to go fossil free by 2021. Then the pair step back into history and recall NASA scientist James Hansen’s US Senate testimony on the dangers of climate change three decades ago.

The Last Lobster

listen / download
Maine lobstermen have hauled unprecedented catches and big profits in recent years as the lobsters have migrated up the east coast. But now, the booming industry is seeing some signs of a downturn as Writer Christopher White explains in his book, The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine’s Greatest Fishery.


Special Features

Lawmakers Call for Pruitt to Resign

listen / download
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is under heavy fire for alleged legal and ethical violations, and a record number of lawmakers say "enough is enough." Some 140 House members and 39 senators, all caucusing with Democrats, have signed on to a non-binding resolution introduced by Representative Kathy Castor of Florida and Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico calling for Mr. Pruitt’s resignation. Senator Tom Udall discusses with host Steve Curwood Pruitt's ethical red flags that have recently come to light, and the EPA rollbacks the Senator says are harmful to human health.
Blog Series: LOE Updates

Field Note: Eagles At Play
In this field note, Living on Earth’s Explorer-in-Residence Mark Seth Lender remarks on the powerful hold the American Bald Eagle has on our collective awe, and on how severely we have decimated their numbers in the centuries since Europeans landed on North America’s shores.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender Field Notes

Sexual Misconduct in the U.S. Forest Service: Michaela Myers' Story

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Michaela Myers finished college in 2017 and landed what she thought was a dream job: working with the US Forest Service fighting wildfires in Oregon. But a pattern of sexual harassment and hazing by her boss and colleagues turned that dream into a nightmare. She tells her story to Living on Earth host Steve Curwood.
Blog Series: LOE Updates


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...Ultimately, if we are going prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we are going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them...

-- President Barack Obama, November 6, 2015 on why he declined to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.

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